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Feed the Hungry Bones, Arthritis Series, Part 5

In the the last article, Nourished Joints are Healthy Joints, we discussed the foods that were contributing to inflammation and should be eliminated from the diet as well as what real food replacements would be beneficial to the body. Today we are going to look at the benefits of bone broth and gelatin and how they can help support a healthy musculoskeletal system.

 

If you missed any of the earlier articles on arthritis you can find them here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4

 

 

Bone Broth is the number one superfood to add into your diet if you have not not already. It is simple to make and packed full of nutrients your joints need.

 

It is important because it contains all the minerals needed to help regrow and repair bone tissue, including collagen, glutamine, glycine, and proline. And the nutrients calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, and potassium.

 

For anyone with joint pain, broken bone, or a low immune system bone broth is essential. It is really just stock that has been cooked for a long time to leech all the good stuff out of the bones.

 

Bone broth can be drank like a warm tea, or used as the base for other dishes such as soups and stews, or as the liquid to casseroles and rice dishes. When drank before bed it can also help you sleep better.(1)

 

Pre-made bone broth is available for those who don’t have time to make their own, but make sure it is well sourced and has not been given a long shelf life by the addition of preservatives and fillers. Here are pre-made bone broths I like: Chicken or Beef.

 

Bone broth is only as healthy as the bones it is made out of. We want bones from healthy happy animals so our bones can be healthy and happy too!

 

Bone broth contains glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate which studies have shown can prevent osteoarthritis. (2)

 

The collagen in bone broth is beneficial for tissue elasticity in the ligaments and tendons as well as your skin, so you may look younger if you drink bone broth.

 

Also, bone broth has been found to help seal a “leaky gut” which can help with IBS, digestive complaints, and food sensitivities because it is rich in gelatin. It’s high concentration of minerals also helps make your immune system stronger, there is a reason why chicken soup is the go to food of grandmother’s for sick kids.

 

Bone Broth Recipe:

1-2 lbs of bones, can be poultry, fish, or beef (source your bones from organic sources, you can ask at your local butcher, asian market, or use the bones after making a turkey or roasting some chickens)

Can also add chicken feet for extra gelatin

Cover with 1-2 gallons of fresh water (cover the bones completely)

Few cloves of garlic

2 TBS of apple cider vinegar

2-3  carrots, chopped

1 teaspoon of sea  salt (or to taste)

1 teaspoon peppercorns.

A few sprigs of herbs (thyme, oregano, sage, etc)

*you can basically add whatever vegetables you have on hand and play with the spices to change the flavor based on what you want to do with it. Also you can think about the nature of your arthritis and make it more warming or cooling based on what ingredients you add.

 

Add everything to big pot, cover and bring to a boil. Let boil for 5 mins then reduce to a simmer and let cook for 12-24 hours (beef bones need longer 24-36 hours). In the first hour of simmering you can skim off and discard any impurities that float to the surface. By the end of cooking the bones should be crumbly and soft. Strain off the solid material using a fine strainer or cheesecloth. Then store in glass jars in sizes that make sense to you. Jars can be in the refrigerator up to a week and in the freezer up to 6 months (when freezing leave space in the top of the jar for expansion).

 

When you make a good quality bone broth and you let it cool, the top will start to firm up into a gelatinous top which is the collagen or gelatin. This is the good stuff, which will be lacking from regular store bought chicken or beef broth.

 

If you don’t have time to make your own bone broth, you can purchase gelatin in powder form and add it to smoothies, your coffee, soups and stews, etc.

 

Now when I say you can buy it, I am not talking about that J-E-L-L-O or Knox gelatin stuff that is full of junk like sugar and artificial coloring. I am talking about real gelatin made from organic free range beef. The brand that I have always used and recommend is Great Lakes, it is certified Paleo friendly, non-GMO, Kosher, and comes from pasture raised grass-fed cows. It comes in two beneficial varieties, Unflavored Beef Gelatin (orange can) and Collagen Hydrolysate (green can).

 

The hydrolysate variety (green can) has already broken down the protein into individual amino acids so it is more easily absorbed, which is better for improving joints, skin, and sleep. I use this everyday in my smoothie.

 

If you want to make gummies or Jell-O like things you want the whole protein gelatin (orange can). If don’t want it to solidify use the green can, this is best for adding to smoothies or other cold dishes. Neither of these will have a flavor so you can add them to pretty much everything or dissolve in plain water.

 

The dose for taking gelatin is 2 tablespoons morning and night. If you would like more information on gelatin and a bunch of awesome recipes, check out this ebook, by my friend Sylvie, The Gelatin Secret.

 

Leave me a comment about what you think of bone broth or how you use it in your health care regime. If you would like to learn more on how to heal your arthritis naturally check out my ebook The Arthritis Answer: Your Step by Step guide to Living Pain Free. Stay tune to the next in this series where I will share another superfood favorite of mine.

 

*Disclosure: This article contains affiliate links that may result in me getting a small commission for purchases made using them. The price is the same for you, and I only recommend products that I would use myself. Statements made are for education purposes not to replace professional medical care.


 

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